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Split custody can benefit both parents and kids

On Behalf of | Aug 14, 2020 | Divorce |

Kids, even when they’re siblings, have unique needs and distinct personalities. Sometimes, this can pose challenges during divorce. However, legal professionals and the courts can help them reach an agreement that works for both parties.

For some parents, split custody can be a practical option.

Split custody can allow parents to provide attentive support

When parents divorce, they must keep their children’s best interests in mind. If their children have varying needs, it can be hard to address them together. Split custody can help, as it can give each parent sole custody of at least one child. This can allow children to live with the parent who fit their accommodations and lifestyle best. Fortunately, they can still establish visitation times with the other child to ensure they have a relationship with both kids.

Situations where split custody can be helpful

Split custody may be a viable option in any of these situations:

  • One child wants to remain at home: Most children aren’t fans of change. If one parent moves far away, they may not want to leave their friends, school activities or other beloved family members behind.
  • There’s an age gap between siblings: If one child is a teenager, living with a parent that has a more hectic work schedule could give them the independence they desire. If the other child is a small toddler, the parent with a more flexible work schedule may be a better fit for them, as they can give them more attention.
  • One child has special needs: There is no one-size-fits-all for special needs. A child could either have a severe medical condition, behavioral issues or cognitive disorder that one parent is better equipped to handle than the other.

Deciding how to handle custody matters is never easy. But with the right guidance, parents can find a plan that works for both them and their children.

 

 

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